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  1. #1
    Gris
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    I'm now considering upgrading from Win98 to WinXP. One feature of Win98 that I often use is the Dos box, or the command-line interface console, that is expanded to the whole screen. I occasionally run Word Perfect for Dos and some other Dos programs under the Dos screen.

    When I accessed the command-line interface console on a Windows XP desktop and expanded the Dos box to the full screen, I noticed that the page contains about 50 lines of text. The lines and texts cluttered so close together, making it difficult to read and a strain to the eyes. This is unlike the Dos box under Win98 which has only 25 lines of text. Could someone please advise me how to configure and permanently save the Dos page under Windows XP so that it has the look and feel of the DOS page under Windows 98. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    3,496

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    I've not run XP in a while. but i would suggest to right-click on the command-prompt icon, and select propertys. This is how it is under win98 as well.
    Another feature you will want to look into is the "auto-completion." Which comes in handy when you type alot of commands. It will allow you to type a single letter, hit tab, and you will be presented with those commands which begin with the letter you typed.
    It might also permit you to cd to different directorys much more faster. Since all you should have to is type a letter and hit tab, such as cd'ing to Program Files should be as simple as typing P, then hitting tab and the rest will autocomplete in.
    I use this feature extensively under UNIX.

  3. #3
    Gris
    Guest

    Default

    Thank you very much, locustfurnace. I have tried configuring in Properties before as you suggested, But I could not manage to configure the number of lines within the Dos page so that only 25 lines fit in the screen. Any suggestion? Thanks.

  4. #4
    ShadowFalls
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    Gris, to make one thing clear, the command-line in Windows XP is only an emulation of DOS, as unlike Windows 98, XP isn't built over DOS and has no real-mode DOS support. Question I do have to ask, is why must you use this program? There are currently newer versions of the program available, best suggestion is to get something that is at least made for Windows.

  5. #5
    Beta
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    España
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    216

    Default

    Originally posted by ShadowFalls@Aug 24 2004, 08:20 PM
    Gris, to make one thing clear, the command-line in Windows XP is only an emulation of DOS, as unlike Windows 98, XP isn't built over DOS and has no real-mode DOS support. Question I do have to ask, is why must you use this program? There are currently newer versions of the program available, best suggestion is to get something that is at least made for Windows.
    You're probably treading on eggshells here suggesting new versions on OV. I take your inference though, if you want to use DOS it would be better suited to an older OS rather than WinXP.

  6. #6
    ShadowFalls
    Guest

    Default

    well I figure this, if the computer can run Windows XP, it shouldn't have issues with a newer version, plus it would include bonus features you didn't have before. I was just doing as any should do, suggesting the best option for the given time.

  7. #7
    Gris
    Guest

    Default

    Thank you, ShadowFalls and Jaime Andrés. In fact, I'm a user of new Windows-oriented programs for a large measure of the time. For file maintenance (i.e. backup, synchronisation, etc.) and computer house-keeping purposes, however, I resort to command-line executables provided by third-parties programmers (i.e. the well-known XXCOPY) and, surprisingly by Windows XP itself. I've found that the command-line interface console provides a simple, fast and efficient way to get routines done.

    I must admit that I've found myself hardly convinced to migrate from Win98 to Win XP. As a non-technical user, I see no real, understandable differences between two OSes. It would therefore do me a good educating service if friends in the know would convince me that migration is beneficial.

    I would be much grateful if someone could assist me on my problem regarding configuration of the Dos box console.

    Thanks and regards

  8. #8
    ShadowFalls
    Guest

    Default

    hey Gris, where about are you located? if you don't mind me asking that

    the Windows XP command-line again, provide an emulation of Dos, the configuration options you saw is all there is.

    Have you ever used a GUI word processing program before? and if so what did you use?

  9. #9
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    3,496

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    Using a DOS Editor has few nice features still lacking in Windows.
    I am currently using a UNIX console editor; VIM with LaTeX, for assisting in writing a book. (vi/vim is also available under Windows)
    The editor is fullscreen, no boxes to shrink workspace. With a gui editor, you have small fonts, too many toolbars which are not necessary.
    A full screen editor, such as vim, which was once a line editor, which old DOS edlin was too, is clean, and extremely fast to navigate. Since there are no mouse movements, you never need to move your hands back and forth between keyboard and mouse Therefore you get more work accomplished. All the task you do with a mouse in gui based editors are keystrokes under Vim, which will always be faster than using a mouse..
    Coping 5 lines of text in a gui based editor usually requires clicking and highlighting the 5 lines with a mouse movement, then a right click, and COPY.
    for Vim, it is as simple as typing the command 5yy. which yanks 5 lines into the buffer.

    One of the best features of using an older DOS editor in DOS is I've never had a problem with DOS, and it has never crashed, therefore I have never lost work writing under DOS.

    I use Vim because it works quickly across the network as well. When I am not home. I can log into my machine at home while away, and continue editing where I left off. No need to take a floppy or CD with my work wherever I go. Then dealing with running a diff against the new version I edited and my other versions. This also means I can easily access my work on Vim whether I am on a T3 line or a 28.8 dial-up. And there will be very minimal slowdown. If I were to use a GUI editor. It just would amount to a hassle or be impossible.




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