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  1. #11
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    3,496

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    12mbpsS + 100mbps does not equal 3GBPS, wishful thinking.

  2. #12
    KITTIE__FVCKIN__ROCKS
    Guest

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    oh is that right homeboy, I can't get a speed of 3Gbps? well then what's this about ??

    http://us.f2.yahoofs.com/bc/4202aa69_eede/...fs_qACB5c_xu3nn

  3. #13
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    3,496

    Default

    That is correct.
    Your Ethernet card cant not exceed there speed. As most if not all home network cards are 100mbps. Thats the limit. A 12mbps card, again, thats its limit.

    Besides, there is no way your system could handle 3Gigabits per second. Considering that the ethernet card sits on the PCI bus, which has a limit of 133mbps.
    10-gigabit cards, require a PCI-X bus.
    So far, the highest speed of recent network cards is a 1-gigabit, those cards are costly.
    It is also HIGHLY unlikely, that you know a single thing about trunking.
    It is also very interesting, that a 10-Gigabit network is still being developed, yet, you in your home, on a $5.00 100mbps card, has managed to do this. These 10-Gigabit cards cost $2000 to $4000 each. 10-Gigabit is still 10 times the cost of 1-Gigabit.
    Not to mention, to achieve a single gigabit network cards speed, you must be hooked to a 1gigabit route, switch, hub.

    How is it, that your ISP, which sets bandwidth throttling on your connection, which the ISP is most likely hooked up to a T3 line, which has a limit of 45mbps, is able to magically grant you 3Gbps, while their own servers, pipeline can not?

    How is it, that by hooking 100mbps and 12mbps, you magically calculated 3,000mbps?
    You have an insight to some unknown mathmatics?

    Lets not forgot to mention, that most people, which have a 10/100 network, can never achieve the rated speeds at home? Yet.. again, you magically break that barrier. Not only are you able to achieve that 100mbps rated speed. but somehow, your cards, blast plast their own designed ability.

    And finally, its also interesting that you achieved 3Gbps when the Internet2 Land Speed Record is 6.86 Gbps.
    http://dnae.home.cern.ch/dnae/lsr4-nov04/

  4. #14
    KITTIE__FVCKIN__ROCKS
    Guest

    Default

    One day the 12.0Mbps connection was coming up with an error notification, you know, the yellow triangle with the black arrow, or maybe the other way around so anyway, I was out of ideas so I just put the two connections together and they both work now!! I don't know how it did it????????? I didn't calculate anything! I just read what it said!!!

    BUt hey that's what it says in the status thingy homeboy. Plus I'm in a small town so don't think I ain't as surprised as you are at this connection I got but I guess dsl can do anything huh?! But not as much as cable of course.

    And also lately I've noticed that the internet downloads pictures in websites, mp3s,or anything on the net for that matter, a lot faster since I made the network bridge thingy. Wonder why hahahahahahahaha

  5. #15
    KITTIE__FVCKIN__ROCKS
    Guest

    Default

    You have an insight to some unknown mathmatics?
    LOL by the way, If I somehow did have any insight to math at all, I would be so f**king glad because I'm horrible at it!

  6. #16
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    3,496

    Default

    Originally posted by KITTIE__FVCKIN__ROCKS@Feb 3 2005, 10:58 PM
    Plus I'm in a small town so don't think I ain't as surprised as you are at this connection I got but I guess dsl can do anything huh?! But not as much as cable of course.
    ADSL technology can provide a maximum downstream (Internet to you) speeds of up to 8Mbps at a distance of about 6,000 feet, upstream speeds of up to 640Kbps. In average use the best speeds achieved are 1.5 Mbps downstream, with upstream speeds varying between 64 and 640 Kbps. As much as you might want to believe that is the speed reached, DSL can not do this. Its the same with your television, not matter how much one wants their old tv's to display HDTV broadcastings, it simply can not. Was not designed to.

    The second fastest record Internet speed, being in the 4GBPS range, was over TCP/IPV6 also. Currently the Internet use TCP/IPv4.

    What you seen displayed, was an error. With MS Windows, errors do happen often.


 

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